Quartet

No glacier calving terminus, no horizon – we are enveloped in fog over a matte green sea and on grey rocks. Right behind the sound of a four-stroke outboard motor, a boat materializes through the fog, cutting a delta through the thick water. It navigates as an aircraft on instrument flight might: its pilot looking intently at a small window of light through which the Global Positioning Satellites feed insight and clarity. A second boat joins. We jump in. We leave. Greenland is behind us but still around us – invisible. We race across the leaden waters, past ghostly icebergs, sending wake waves into each other’s path.
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The Sun pierces a luminous round hole in our grey world. The fog rises a corner. Rocky shores fly by. We look back and the dissolving fog festoons glorious peaks. Greenland is saying goodbye in style. It doesn’t matter where I point the…

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Exiting the Glacier System

It is time to return to civilization. To come down the ice, we choose a vast glacier that calves into the fjords – the Kaarale Gletcher. As the glacier twists and turns, it hides ice falls and crevasse fields. We intuit the best path down by eyeing the fall lines and identifying the smoothest and most continuous ones. The approach succeeds – although in truth we will never know whether we found the best path. In a matter of hours we are at the snow line. Ahead of us lies a lunar landscape of sooted ice fins. It is so outrageous and unnatural I think I am looking at an algorithm-generated landscape in a video game. Only pure mathematics could come up with something like this. It is tempting to stop looking for a path in this maze and to just take any line. Matt, however, seems to have a plan and…

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Greenland and Childhood Dreams

For several nightless days we traversed eastern Greenland’s glaciers. Wherever we turned, just about every peak had its own glacier dropping and merging into the large ice sheets that were supporting us. During one magic moment, I had a strange sense of déjà vu – I was in one of the expansive scenes Hergé beautifully drew for Tintin in Tibet, and which I had seen when I was a little kid. How much of our life’s design takes on childhood moments as strong influences? Do you remember moments of wonder that made you dream? What happened to those dreams? In Greenland, I was fulfilling childhood dreams. To use modern language, I was becoming complete.
The most fundamental inspiration in my life has actually always been the Moon landings. Everything I have ever done has been project-based and mission oriented because that’s how I conceive of a life well lived…

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Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

The Border Collie Inquisitor

Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

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 Adopting a dog from a shelter is an exciting, feel-good event. For many families, it’s a special moment, sure to become part of the family lore. For the dog, however, assimilating into family life can be difficult. Sadly, many dogs are returned to the shelter for behavior problems, which is heartbreaking for the family and a disaster for the dog. Experienced dog trainers can help smooth the transition, spare family heartache, and save dogs’ lives.

Every animal shelter should have an area for training.

“The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter is undergoing a highly anticipated renovation to build a much-needed area for on-site training. Won’t you make a donation, no amount too small that will make a meaningful difference in the lives of sheltered dogs?”

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If it wasn’t for a shelter and rescue network along with training…

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Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

donate paw button

Featured Image -- 1653

 Adopting a dog from a shelter is an exciting, feel-good event. For many families, it’s a special moment, sure to become part of the family lore. For the dog, however, assimilating into family life can be difficult. Sadly, many dogs are returned to the shelter for behavior problems, which is heartbreaking for the family and a disaster for the dog. Experienced dog trainers can help smooth the transition, spare family heartache, and save dogs’ lives.

Every animal shelter should have an area for training.

“The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter is undergoing a highly anticipated renovation to build a much-needed area for on-site training. Won’t you make a donation, no amount too small that will make a meaningful difference in the lives of sheltered dogs?”

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If it wasn’t for a shelter and rescue network along with training, I dread to think what would have become of one dog in particular. His name was Tulley.

TULLEY’S STORY

 One day, I received a call from a trainer in New Jersey. He said he had been working with a three-year-old Border Collie that needed to be re-homed.  “Can you help? Over the last year, he’s gotten aggressive with his owners, their child, and other animals. He’s bitten a few times.”

I agreed to meet this dog. As I slowly approached I observed a beautiful black and white border collie. His body stiffened, and he averted his eyes. He became increasingly uncomfortable the closer I got. I slowly kneeled down next to him. He took a deep breath and let out a very long, low guttural growl. His fur stood on end, and his lips curled tightly, baring every one of his teeth. And yet, I didn’t feel threatened. He never made eye contact nor did he lunge to bite.  I felt empathy for the dog and decided to help him.

First, we needed to learn to trust one another. The training started with teaching Tulley the “touch” technique. It was so heartwarming when he wiggled with excitement whenever we played the game. When I took him to the obedience classes that I taught we worked him in his “comfort zone,” kept the sessions short and full of rewards, praise and fun! He learned quickly how to relax and trust. Fun With agility followed after obedience classes. Agility class was a weekly favorite of Tulley’s, where he moved, joyful and carefree, through the equipment, one obstacle at a time.

I was so proud of his accomplishments; he was truly bonding with me and my family.

After working diligently with Tulley and witnessing him become the dog he was born to be, my husband and I officially adopted him into our family.  He integrated beautifully with our children and our other dogs. Tulley was a joy and a blessing to our family for the next ten years.

Godspeed to our beloved Tulley (2001-2014).

“Tulley” – from Irish Gaelic roots, meaning “mighty people,” “living with God’s                        peace,” “devoted to God’s will.” 

 See Tulley’s full storyhttps://bordercollieinquisitor.com/2013/07/27/mean-dog/

For the sake of so many dogs like Tulley won’t you please consider making a donation to a much-needed on-site training area at Griffin Pond Animal Shelter?  You will be helping so many dogs who are looking for their forever home, but are in need of extra love, support and training in order to thrive and flourish.  Your gift will help these dogs get the training they need in order to move on to a better life.

Tulley

(Terri pictured with Tulley)

Our goal is $300,000.00 let’s spark a movement, Please share far and wide. Our animals’ futures depend on it.

Many thanks for your generosity and kindness.

Terri Florentino, Writer, Editor, Canine Behavioral Instructor.

http://www.griffinpondanimalshelter.com/capital-campaign/

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Science!

Thanks to an infinitely gracious person, I was able to “do science” during my scouting trip to Greenland.

For some, it may be enough to see a great picture of Pluto. For scientists, there is a lot more to know. Curiosity extends to invisible wavelengths, and to dynamic processes going back to the origin of the planet. They are not necessarily looking for sensational findings – although that helps get funding from government and public sources – as much as they seek understanding and insight.
As soon as we look beyond the surface, Nature, as we call it, looks unbelievably complex. Science’s triumph is to be able to find regularities in that complexity, and to express them in beautiful conciseness. When we understand the Navier-Stokes equations, or the Maxwell equations, or thermodynamic cycles, or even Laplace and Fourier transforms, it is as if blinders had come off our eyes. We never…

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On the Ice Fields

We are on the Schweizerland glaciers, hiking along, deep in the rhythm of the hike. Most of our attention is focused on keeping our rope tight, so that a fall into a crevasse would be arrested instantly.
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During breaks, while me colleagues eat and rest, I collect my first two snow samples. Twice, I fill a ziplock bag with surface snow from a square I have drawn next to me, awkwardly, with an ice axe. At the end of the day, I will melt the snow and filter it to capture the dust and black carbon  it contains. Black carbon comes from the incomplete combustion of organic compounds, such as forest fires. Black carbon and dust travel along local and planetary wind highways to land on snow and ice and change their reflectivity and heat absorption rates – and, therefore, their melting rate. Scientists are keenly interested in understanding how…

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