Author Archives: terriflorentino

Our little Expedition is on the Daily Camera

Science correspondent for the Daily Camera Charlie Brennan nicely captures and frames the approach to our science expedition and the motivations that propel it in Saturday morning’s top story.

As we were talking with Charlie, it hit me how much of a Boulder endeavor this is – from ASD Inc. contributing the spectroradiometer, to Boulder Mountain Repair fabricating our bespoke sled covers, to Epicenter Creative designing the mission patch, to Destination Epic donating our polar tent and managing our nutrition, to local heroes Eric LarsenAndrew Skurka, and Gary Neptune – and the terrific store he founded – sharing their wisdom; and many others giving us inspiration and encouragement. Our little town casts a shadow much bigger than we are.

Preparations continue at a frantic pace. Tomorrow, Dr. Horodyskyj, our Principal Investigator and founder of Science in the Wild, will be finalizing sampling procedures with the spectroradiometer…

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19 days to Baffin

Little by little the Penny Ice Cap Expedition is taking over my mind and my time. Abstractions and generalities about a great adventure turn into a thousand details that matter. The easy details are taken care of, and the tough ones are now front and center, as the clock ticks away towards our scheduled take off: April 10, 1500 UTC.

In parallel, we build our support network. Patrick will handle emergency operations, were they to be needed. He will also channel social networking for Science in the Wild. Wendy is Master Nutritionist for the expedition; and will handle social networking for Boundless Focus. We are recruiting a weather person, to keep us aware of the meso-scale picture while on the ice cap.

As the date approaches and we figure out all of the equipment details, we are about to shift to mission simulations – on the ice, and in the…

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Eleven days before take off — Cold Latitudes

We are living the knowledge economy. We sit and ponder about narrower and narrower topics, neurons within a superb yet spiralingly complex lattice of sensors, sense-makers, and deciders. With that backdrop, it is a welcome change of pace to work with my hands, modifying sleds, building cooking tables, labeling equipment bags, folding a large and […]

via Eleven days before take off — Cold Latitudes

Quartet

No glacier calving terminus, no horizon – we are enveloped in fog over a matte green sea and on grey rocks. Right behind the sound of a four-stroke outboard motor, a boat materializes through the fog, cutting a delta through the thick water. It navigates as an aircraft on instrument flight might: its pilot looking intently at a small window of light through which the Global Positioning Satellites feed insight and clarity. A second boat joins. We jump in. We leave. Greenland is behind us but still around us – invisible. We race across the leaden waters, past ghostly icebergs, sending wake waves into each other’s path.
Quartet-5
The Sun pierces a luminous round hole in our grey world. The fog rises a corner. Rocky shores fly by. We look back and the dissolving fog festoons glorious peaks. Greenland is saying goodbye in style. It doesn’t matter where I point the…

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Exiting the Glacier System

It is time to return to civilization. To come down the ice, we choose a vast glacier that calves into the fjords – the Kaarale Gletcher. As the glacier twists and turns, it hides ice falls and crevasse fields. We intuit the best path down by eyeing the fall lines and identifying the smoothest and most continuous ones. The approach succeeds – although in truth we will never know whether we found the best path. In a matter of hours we are at the snow line. Ahead of us lies a lunar landscape of sooted ice fins. It is so outrageous and unnatural I think I am looking at an algorithm-generated landscape in a video game. Only pure mathematics could come up with something like this. It is tempting to stop looking for a path in this maze and to just take any line. Matt, however, seems to have a plan and…

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Greenland and Childhood Dreams

For several nightless days we traversed eastern Greenland’s glaciers. Wherever we turned, just about every peak had its own glacier dropping and merging into the large ice sheets that were supporting us. During one magic moment, I had a strange sense of déjà vu – I was in one of the expansive scenes Hergé beautifully drew for Tintin in Tibet, and which I had seen when I was a little kid. How much of our life’s design takes on childhood moments as strong influences? Do you remember moments of wonder that made you dream? What happened to those dreams? In Greenland, I was fulfilling childhood dreams. To use modern language, I was becoming complete.
The most fundamental inspiration in my life has actually always been the Moon landings. Everything I have ever done has been project-based and mission oriented because that’s how I conceive of a life well lived…

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Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

The Border Collie Inquisitor

Unleash the Spirit of Generosity, Be a Hero to a Homeless Pet.

donate paw button

 Adopting a dog from a shelter is an exciting, feel-good event. For many families, it’s a special moment, sure to become part of the family lore. For the dog, however, assimilating into family life can be difficult. Sadly, many dogs are returned to the shelter for behavior problems, which is heartbreaking for the family and a disaster for the dog. Experienced dog trainers can help smooth the transition, spare family heartache, and save dogs’ lives.

Every animal shelter should have an area for training.

“The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter is undergoing a highly anticipated renovation to build a much-needed area for on-site training. Won’t you make a donation, no amount too small that will make a meaningful difference in the lives of sheltered dogs?”

 cap

If it wasn’t for a shelter and rescue network along with training…

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